Whidbey General Hospital

I Can Cope - Online Classes

I Can Cope® is a free online educational program for people facing cancer and their families and friends. The program is comprised of self-paced classes that can be taken any time, day or night. Take as few or as many classes as you like. No registration is required.

I Can Cope

 

Visit I Can Cope on the American Cancer Society website, where classes include:

Learning About Cancer

More than one million people get cancer each year. More and more people continue to survive cancer because of better treatments and earlier diagnosis.

In this class, you will learn:

    • Basics about cancer and how it is diagnosed and treated
    • Tips for talking to doctors, friends, and family about cancer
    • How a caregiver can help and where to get more information about cancer

 

Understanding Cancer Treatments

Every person is unique. This means that people with the same cancer may respond to treatment differently.

In this class, you will learn:

    • Four main types of cancer treatment
    • How to find a clinical trial
    • Types of complementary methods that may be helpful for people with cancer
    • How a caregiver can help and where to get more information about cancer treatments

 

Managing the Effects of Illness and Treatment

Some people have side effects from cancer treatment while others don’t have any. This is because every person responds to treatment differently. Many side effects of treatment can be managed or treated.

In this class, you will learn:

    • Common physical and emotional side effects of treatment
    • How to track side effects
    • How a caregiver can help and where to get more information about managing side effects

 

Communicating Concerns and Feelings 

Cancer and cancer treatment bring major changes to your life. These changes can cause many different emotions.

In this class, you will learn:

    • How to talk to your friends, family, and children about your diagnosis and treatment
    • Tips for talking to doctors, nurses, and coworkers about cancer
    • How a caregiver can help and where to get more information on talking about cancer

 

Relieving Cancer Pain 

If you are concerned about cancer pain, you should know that pain can be treated.

In this class, you will learn:

    • Facts about cancer pain and the different types
    • How to manage pain with medicine and non-medical treatments
    • How to develop a pain control plan with your doctor and questions to ask
    • How a caregiver can help and where you can get more information about cancer pain

 

Nutrition During Treatment Part 1

Eating well during treatment can help someone with cancer to feel better, maintain their energy, heal and recover more quickly.

In this class, you will learn:

    • Basics about nutrition and tips for treatment
    • How dietary supplements can affect treatment
    • How a caregiver can help and where to get more information about nutrition and cancer

 

Nutrition During Treatment Part 2

Good nutrition can help someone better manage side effects of their cancer treatment.

In this class, you will learn:

    • Nutrition tips for managing side effects of treatment
    • How a caregiver can help and where to get more information about nutrition and cancer

 

Mobilizing Resources and Support

When diagnosed with cancer, many people find they need to ask for and accept help or support. This can include support from friends, family, or community resources.

In this class, you will learn:

    • The types of support available to people with cancer
    • How to build a support network and find resources in your community
    • How to identify suspicious websites

 

Managing Cancer-related Fatigue

Fatigue is when someone does not have enough energy to do the things he or she wants to do. Fatigue is the most common side effect of cancer and cancer treatment. In fact, about 90% of cancer patients receiving treatment have fatigue.

In this class, you will learn:

    • Basics about cancer-related fatigue and its causes in people with cancer
    • How to describe fatigue to your doctor and questions to ask
    • How a caregiver can help and where you can get more information about cancer-related fatigue

 

Exploring Self-Esteem and Intimacy

The diagnosis of cancer is likely to be stressful not only for you, but also for your spouse or partner. This stress can affect emotional and physical intimacy.

In this class, you will learn:

    • How myths about cancer can influence your relationships
    • Tips for creating emotional intimacy
    • Strategies for coping with changes in physical intimacy
    • Where to get more information about cancer and intimacy

 

Nutrition and Physical Activity After Treatment

Everyone can benefit from living a healthy lifestyle. Making good dietary and physical activity choices may be especially helpful for people after cancer treatment, when the body is recovering and may need an extra boost.

In this class, you will learn:

    • Maintain a healthy weight
    • Adopt an active lifestyle and eat a healthy diet

 

Keeping Well in Mind, Body, and Spirit

The concept of wellness encourages people to focus on the whole person and how the mind, body, and spirit work together to achieve a sense of well-being. 

In this class, you will learn:

    • The five areas of wellness and how to manage stress
    • The benefits of physical activity for a person with cancer
    • The difference between complementary and alternative therapies

 

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Outstanding Quality

Dr. John Hoyt, Dr. Amy Picco (seated) and Renee Yanke, ARNP, serve on the Whidbey General Cancer Committee. The Commission on Cancer reaccredited our cancer care program in 2012 with the maximum eight commendations. Very few hospitals achieve this distinction. We also received the commission's annual Outstanding Achievement Award, an honor shared in 2012 by only 79 hospitals in the country and one other hospital in Washington. Read more about this prestigious award.

Testimonials

"All of you shine with love and caring!— the doctors, nurses, clerical staff and others we’ve encountered and are blessed to have met. Why we’re here is not our choice, but we couldn’t think of a better place to go through this journey. We are so grateful." Read more comments about our Cancer Program.

 

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Dear 16-year-old me

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